Remembrances of Drs. David Hervey and James D. Maxwell

The clipping noted below, written by Agnes McCulloch Hanna, was published in an undated, unsourced Bloomington newspaper under a column called “Looking Back.”  It was found in a scrapbook compiled by a man named Fred Lockwood.  The scrapbook is held by the Monroe County History Center, Bloomington, Indiana.  The item below was abbreviated from the original, as noted by the ellipsis, and excludes much of the information pertaining to the home built by Joshua Owen Howe later the property of David H. Maxwell.

According to information from the Rose Hill Cemetery Index, David H. Maxwell was born September 17, 1786, and died May 24, 1854.  His burial was in Rose Hill.

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…Dr. David Hervey Maxwell had written the constitution of our state with his own hand, and it may be seen to this day in our archives.  In 1838 his son, Dr. James D. Maxwell was elected to the Board of Trustees of Indiana University and held this office with the exception of a short period until his death in 1892.  In the discharge of his duties as secretary and trustee, he was noted for his fidelity and abiding faith in the ultimate success of the institution.

He helped his college through trial by fire and political controversy and was steadfast to it.  He saw it develop to the new and enlarged institution on its new campus.  Maxwell Hall is named in honor of David Hervey and James Darwin Maxwell.  His service rendered with no financial reward.  Miss Juliette Maxwell, youngest of his daughters, offers an annual prize to women students of the university, the James Darwin Maxwell medal, for excellence in scholarship and principals.

In a spacious house [on S. College Avenue, described at length in an earlier MCHC library blog] he and Mrs. Maxwell entertained twice each year the trustees and members of the faculty and their wives at dinner parties.  Dr. James Darwin Maxwell was born in 1815 near Hanover, Ind.  Of his ten children, three daughters are living—Mrs. Allan B. Philputt of Indianapolis, Miss Juliette Maxwell who resigned recently from the department of physical training at the university, and Miss Fannie Bell Maxwell, formerly an instructor at Ferry Hall, Lake Forest, Ill.  Mrs. Grace Philputt Young, his granddaughter, is a member of the Department of Romance Languages of which her husband is the head at Indiana.

This is a family which is tied intimately to our state and its university.  The house, which was for many years connected with the town and college, still holds its place as it is now the home of the Burton-Woolery post of the American Legion, many of whose members were graduated from the university, some of whom are attached to the university and all of whom see and take part in its activities.  A long life and a happy one, the Howe-Maxwell house has had in Bloomington.  Few can belong more closely to the community.  –Indianapolis Star

Blog post by Randi Richardson

 

Regulators Organization Established to Deal with Lawbreakers

The clipping noted below, written by Mrs. Wesley Hayse, was published in an undated, unsourced Bloomington newspaper under a column called “Looking Back.”  It was found in a scrapbook compiled by a man named Fred Lockwood.  The scrapbook is held by the Monroe County History Center, Bloomington, Indiana.  The item below was abbreviated from the original, as noted by the ellipsis, and excludes information pertaining to the development of Polk Township.

Horse thieves, crooks of every kind, burglars and counterfeiters seemed to overrun Indiana in the late forties and early fifties, and Monroe County seemed to receive her share of the unwelcome visitors.  Within the county, where the rough country was scarcely inhabited, the ravines and thickets furnished excellent retreats for the outlaws.

The southeastern portion of Monroe County showed early evidence of illegal transactions of this character and several residents of Polk Township were at times suspected of complicity, but nothing definite was learned until late in the fifties.

Many men of good character, who had previously bore good reputations, were sometimes inducted to connect themselves with manufacturers of counterfeit bills or bogus coins in order to reap a harvest for the time being, intending to later resume their places of respect among their fellowmen.

Before this, counterfeit bills on different state banks and bad coin of fair appearance, color and weight had made its appearance in the county at stores, and steps had been taken to find the guilty person or persons, but the rascals had a well-organized system and soon baffled the authorities.  It was no doubt but more of this money was actually manufactured within the county as passers of counterfeit money were quite numerous.

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But finally conditions became so bad that an organization known as the Regulators, men of honesty in Monroe County and vicinity, resolved to, by their own efforts, end the career of the lawbreakers if careful vigilance and persistent effort could possibly bring such things to pass.  And these men did succeed and the plan soon became quite popular as the means of settling with criminals.

One man was shot in the jail in Bloomington by a mysterious crowd of men who overpowered the guards.

In a short time the plan meant grave abuses when a number of men held a grudge against a neighbor they would assemble at night, thoroughly disguised, and give the man a terrible whipping.  A man named Bingham received such severe treatment in this way that his body was a mass of bruised and blackened flesh from the whipping he received.  He died from the wounds within a few days, and he was said to be an honest, upright citizen.

Another man, named Vansickle, who lived in the southern part of Monroe County, was so severely whipped by masked men who took him out one night that he later died from the effects at what became known as “Vansickle’s Mill” in the southern part of Morgan County…

Bloomington Man Loses Life Aboard the Titanic

The clipping noted below, written by Blaine W. Bradfute, was published in an undated, unsourced Bloomington newspaper under a column called “Looking Back.”  It was found in a scrapbook compiled by a man named Fred Lockwood.  The scrapbook is held by the Monroe County History Center, Bloomington, Indiana. 

In 1900, according to census information, 47-year old John B. Crafton, the owner of stone quarries, lived with his wife, Sarah, and son, Harry, at 115 E. 7th Street (sic) in Bloomington; in 1910, Dr. J. Edmund Luzadder lived at 115 E. 8th St.  A digital image of Crafton’s January 1912 passport application indicates that he was born in Owen County, Indiana.

titanicThe first man who planned and boasted to his friends that he would make a million dollars out of the local stone industry was John B. Crafton, the only local man who was lost in the sinking of the Titanic when that great ocean liner struck an iceberg on its premier voyage nearly two decades ago.

Mr. Crafton was undoubtedly the most farseeing man of his day in the Bloomington stone belt and had he lived to an old age he would likely have cashed in his stone holdings for more than a million.  Having a great belief in the future of stone, Mr. Crafton leased many hundred acres of land in the local belt and at one time had a large amount of the finest stone land in the county under lease.  For twenty-five years Crafton dabbled in stone land, leasing tract after tract.  Four decades ago the investment in stone quarries and mills was very small and the output was correspondingly small.  The Hunter Valley quarry was one of the first successful companies operated northeast of Bloomington, and when the Hunter Valley was sold for $100,000 to become the Consolidated, the selling price was held up as a big fortune.

The writer as a boy heard John B. Crafton remark, “I may not live to see it but my son, Harry, will someday get a million dollars for my stone holdings.”

Mr. Crafton’s prediction that out of his stone leases would come a fortune of a million dollars to his son did not prove true as his life was cut short when the Titanic was lost; the Crafton stone operations ended just about the time stone properties began to greatly increase in value.  Had he lived and continued his stone operations as he planned, he would have undoubtedly left a fortune of over a million, and as it turned out he left a comfortable estate to his wife and son—or so it was generally supposed at the time.

Mr. Crafton was in his stateroom at the time the Titanic ran into the huge iceberg which ripped one side of the vessel open much as if it had been a huge can opener.  Mr. Crafton was not seen about the vessel by the survivors at any time after the accident, and it was supposed that he met an instant death in his stateroom when the iceberg was struck.

The Crafton family during the years of residence in Bloomington lived in the house on East 8th Street, now occupied by the Dr. Luzzader family.  Although the body was not picked out of the sea, and undoubtedly found a burial place in the hull of the Titanic which sank in the deep water off the Atlantic, a stone monument in Rose Hill Cemetery was erected by the widow to the memory of Mr. Crafton—one of the men who in the early days had a true vision of what the great Bloomington stone belt was to become.

Post by Randi Richardson

A Descriptive History of the Howe/Maxwell House

The clipping noted below, written Agnes McCulloch Hanna, was published in an undated, unsourced Bloomington newspaper under a column called “Looking Back.”  It was found in a scrapbook compiled by a man named Fred Lockwood.  The scrapbook is held by the Monroe County History Center, Bloomington, Indiana.  The item below was abbreviated from the original, as noted by the ellipsis, and excludes information pertaining the Maxwells’ involvement with the authorship of Indiana’s constitution and Indiana University.

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The Howe/Maxwell house on South College near Second Street has been home to many businesses including Planned Parenthood and the American Legion.  From the front, the building doesn’t look its age, but from the view from the back, as noted above, is more telling.  

The bricks for the old Joshua Owen Howe home in Bloomington were brought from Louisville, Ky., although stone lay just under the grass of the building site.  The pioneers of Monroe County knew nothing of the wonderful material within their reach, and when they were ready to replace the early log structures, they sent for brick that as baked in distance kilns.  These in this simple, dignified house on South College Avenue were among those brought from Kentucky.

Joshua Owen Howe came to Indiana and the village of Bloomington in 1819 and became a leading merchant.  His people had come to Ellicots Mills in Maryland before the revolutionary war and were manufacturers there.  In Bloomington he built his first cabin and store on the public square and cleared away great trees and underbrush that the townspeople might have easy access to his store.  He lived there some 15 years.  Then, having made a success of his ventures, he decided to build a new and larger home near the college.  He bought a plot of ground and built the house which stands today much as he built it, although it is possible that the bay windows were later additions.

The house is three stories high.  The woodwork is painted white with the exception of the doors which are cherry.  The treatment of the massive window casings is unusual.  All the carving and grooving is handwork.  In the ceiling the plaster is indented to correspond, a means of decoration not seen before.  The inside, folding shutters belong to the period.

Ten great fireplaces were in the house in the early days.  They were replaced by stoves later and then by radiators.  Three fireplaces are still in the house.  Mrs. Allan B. Philputt of Indianapolis, one of the granddaughters of the Howe family, says that the fireplace in the south room had a very high mantel piece which was so tall that it was difficult to reach for dusting.  In that sunny room Louisa “Dovie” Howe, Mrs. James Darwin Maxwell, could be found most of the hours of her busy life.  The sun poured in there through the bay windows and the fire gave wonderful warmth to the babies who were rocked in the little, old rocking chair and to the older children who brought to her their troubles and joys.  There she sat to mend for her children and to wait for her busy, physician husband who was riding horseback through the country on his long calls or was busy with the affairs of the new state college for which he was resident trustee.  The college was a near neighbor to the Maxwell house.

The center halls of the house are wide and high.  The circular staircase is the most interesting feature with easy ash treads, and the handmade bannister.  The lower hall leads from the recessed front door with its silver luster bell pull to the series of rooms built at the rear, the kitchen, pantry, wash and wood houses.  A brick pavement outside the last rooms had in it two cisterns called the “summer” and the “winter.”  Even in those early days the infrequent rainfall was carefully conserved in Bloomington.  The [American] Legion post which now owns the house has thrown two rooms together and uses the pantry as kitchen.

In 1843, Dr. James Darwin Maxwell, son of Dr. David Hervey Maxwell and Mary Dunn, married Louisa “Dovie” Howe in this house.  The only bridesmaid was Jane Nowland, youngest daughter of Matthias R. Nowland of Indianapolis.  Miss Nowland made her home with the Howe family while she attended the female seminary.

Ten children were born to the James Maxwell, and in spite of the fact that the grounds about the house were large and that through them ran a brook, Mrs. Maxwell said that when each of her four boys brought a companion to play and the six little girls wanted space for their games, she felt the need of a farm at the very least.  So the family went to the country where there was room and to spare.  The house they occupied a few miles from town has been made over into two large houses.

When the children were grown they came back to this house.  Here Dr. David Hervey Maxwell came to spend his last years.  He had been much interested in the development of the railroads, and as a man of vision had hoped to see one come to Bloomington.  From whispers and hushed sentences about him, he was convinced that the first train was about to enter the town, and he was ill!  When he was left alone on that day in 1854, he got up from his bed, dressed himself and ran across the fields between his home and the tracks and was present at the momentous entrance of the Monon train…

Blog Post by Randi Richardson

 

 

Chapel Hill Established in Polk Township

The clipping noted below, written by Mrs. Wesley Hayse, was published in an undated, unsourced Bloomington newspaper under a column called “Looking Back.”  It was found in a scrapbook compiled by a man named Fred Lockwood.  The scrapbook is held by the Monroe County History Center, Bloomington, Indiana.  The item below was abbreviated from the original, as noted by the ellipsis, and excludes information pertaining to the establishment of Regulators in Polk Township.

The Chapel Hill community, established about 1856 in Section 31, T7N, R1E, of Polk Township, was named for the Chapel Hill Methodist Church. (The location noted in the text below is incomplete as stated.)  In 1860, four years after the establishment of Chapel Hill, John Todd lived with his wife, Elizabeth, and five minor children, in Polk Township.  His occupation was farmer and he owned real estate valued at $3,000 and personal property valued at $1,000.  His post office address was Smithville.  He died on September 14, 1895, and was buried in the Todd Cemetery located in Section 26 of Polk Township.

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Chapel Hill is located in Section 31 noted at the bottom left of this 1876 map of Polk Township.

…Polk Township in the southeast part of Monroe County, like Salt Creek Township, had hopes of building a thriving city at one time.  When the township was created in 1849, it was named for James K. Polk, eleventh president of the United States, the nearest village was established at “Todd’s Big Spring” where elections were held in the house of John Todd for several years; the old blacksmith shop was used later.  Will Davis and Samuel Axam [consider Axsom a spelling variant] were the first fence viewers.  Peter Norman was first inspector of elections and Will Davis was the first constable in the township.

David Miller and John Smith decided that the township should be represented by having a metropolis within its lines, so in October 1856 these men, as [land] owners, employed the country surveyor to lay off 27 lots on the northwest quarter of the southeast quarter of township North, Range 1 East in Polk Township and named the village “Chapel Hill.”

The hope of establishing a thriving city was soon doomed to disappointment, for after the start was made the infant village was too weak to survive.  Although the village died there still remains near the site one of the most picturesque hills with its steep road blasted and carved through and over the solid rock.

Post by Randi Richardson

 

 

Monroe County’s First Deed Recorded in Orange

 

The clipping noted below, written by Fred Lockwood, was published in an undated, unsourced Bloomington newspaper under a column called “Looking Back.”  It was found in a scrapbook compiled by Lockwood.  The scrapbook is held by the Monroe County History Center, Bloomington, Indiana. 

The Corps of Canadian Volunteers fought for America in the War of 1812 and subsequently received land grants, some of which were in Indiana including what is now part of Monroe County.   

Because there is no evidence of anyone name Finney in Monroe County census records from 1820 through and including 1850, it seems likely that Finney never settled in Monroe.  Additionally, as there is no deed record in Monroe County reflecting a sale of property by Finney, it is probable that he sold the land purchased from Jackson while the property was still part of Orange County.

The first deed of record in the office of the county recorder is found in Deed Record A which contains all the deeds made in Monroe County and recorded from December 1817 to December 1825.

deedThe first indenture of record was made and recorded on December 5, 1817, when Josiah Jackson of the County of Orange sold to James Finney of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, two quarter sections of land in what is now Van Buren Township, Monroe County, for $1,450.  When this deed was recorded, the land laid in Orange County.  (An act of the general assembly authorized the formation of Monroe County out of Orange County, which act was approved on January 14, 1818.)

Reading over the deed we find that Mr. Jackson was a Canadian volunteer sergeant being in the corps of Canadian volunteers and the two quarter sections of Monroe County land, then Orange County land, were given him by a law then in force allowing soldiers land grants at the time of the James Madison regime.  Mr. Jackson received this land from President Madison on October 26, 1816, and the grant was made a matter of record in the general land office at Washington, D. C. of that date.

W. Goddard of Fleming County, Kentucky, a justice of the peace, made an acknowledgement of the deed and Alex S. Lyle, deputy clerk of the Fleming County court certified the act.

The land conveyed comprised “two quarter sections lying and being in the County of Orange, District of Vincennes, namely the southeast quarter of Section 36, of Township 8 North in Range 2 West, also a northeast quarter of Section 30, 8 North, 2 West.”

Blog by Randi Richardson

 

Pioneer Fire Company Established

The clipping noted below, written by Olive Lorraine Cox, was published in an undated, unsourced Bloomington newspaper under a column called “Looking Back.”  It was found in a scrapbook compiled by a man named Fred Lockwood.  The scrapbook is held by the Monroe County History Center, Bloomington, Indiana.

J. W. Jackson, who is mentioned in the article, is James Jackson who, according to census information, was 29 in 1880 when he was enumerated in Bloomington with his wife, Laura, and two children:  Minnie and Walter.  According to a digital image of the death record at Ancestry.com, Walter died in Martinsville on February 24, 1930.  That information helps to date the publication of the article.

Just as today, officials of Bloomington have deemed it necessary to purchase larger and better firefighting equipment.  Good citizens of Bloomington back in 1838 decided that the town must have a fire company.  The city’s present wagons and other equipment would indeed seem wonderful to the brave firefighters of almost a century ago.

An effort was made in 1838 to get a real, up-to-date fire wagon (of the hand pump variety) but the effort failed, chiefly because of lack of money.  But not many years later the enterprise succeeded and an organization was put through—the Pioneer Fire Company.

This organization of progressive citizenry continued its work for several decades before it was discontinued in favor of more modern equipment.  The hand-drawn book and ladder wagon was kept in one corner of the old courthouse along with an array of fire buckets and a hose reel.  Each member of the Pioneer Company paid $1 entrance fee and $.10 a month dues.  However, members of the company were exempt from paying road taxes.

One of the old “Pioneers” was J. W. Jackson who spent many years of his long life in Bloomington as a fireman and who died only a few years ago.  Mr. Jackson, who was a fireman in several other cities as well as in Bloomington, attended more than 3,000 fires in 30 odd years of service.  One daughter and three nephews of Mr. Jackson are living in Bloomington at the present time:  Mrs. Will Duncan, John G., Elmer and Russell Jackson.  Two sons are living, George at Sacramento, Calif., and Albert at Detroit, Mich.  Another son, Walter, died a few weeks ago at Martinsville.

The picture illustrating the story is from the collection of the Monroe County History Center.  It depicts a 1942 fire at the Harris Grand Theatre.

Blog post by Randi Richardson