Civil War Roll of Honor—1883

uncle samBlog post by Randi Richardson

Memorial Day is a day to remember and honor those who served our country in the time of war.  It is a tradition that far exceeds the bounds of Monroe County stretching from America’s east coast to the west. It’s also a very old tradition.

On page one of the Bloomington Telephone published June 2, 1883, and available online at Hoosier State Chronicles, a free website, is a listing of Monroe County soldiers who either died in the service or since the war.  The list includes hundreds of names along with the regiment number and remarks such as place and cause of death.  Occasionally a death date is also included.

Unfortunately, the list is compiled in random order by regiment and not alphabetically.  However, if you have been searching for a Civil War veteran it may be worth your time to scan through this list carefully to determine if your ancestor is included.  A few examples are noted below.

George W. Whitaker, 82nd Reg’t, died at Bowling Green, Ky.

Elvin Farmer, Colored Reg’t, died at Memphis

William McDermott, 82nd Reg’t, died of wounds rec’d at Chickamauga

David P. Sutphin, 28th Ind., died of disease at home in Indianapolis

Francis Otwell, Jr., 27th Ind., died at Indianapolis July 27 ‘74

James W. Nichols, 38th Reg’t, died at Andersonville prison

A few years later a similar list was published in the Bloomington Telephone on May 8, 1922 (see p. 4).  There were many more dates of death in this news item than in the one noted above.  The latter list was viewed online at www.newspaperarchive.com, a paid website, but it should also be available on microfilm at the Monroe County Public Library.  The list took up the entire page but about a third of the page was not legible.

Affidavits for Soldier’s Exemptions

In 1927 the federal government determined that “any honorably discharged soldier, sailor, marine or nurse who had served at least 90 days or more in the military or naval forces of the United States and who was totally disabled as evidenced by a pension certificate or the award of compensation, and the widow of any such soldier, sailor or marine, may have the amount of $1,000 deducted from his or her taxable property providing the amount of taxable property as shown by the tax duplicate shall not exceed the amount of $5,000 and the amount remaining after such deduction shall have been made shall constitute the basis for assessment and taxation.  PROVIDED, FURTHER, that the age of 62 shall constitute the basis of total disability for any pensioner.  Acts 1927, p. 519.)”

In 1938 and 1939, Monroe County collected the information from those claiming an exemption under the 1927 Act and compiled them into books, one for each year.   The unpaginated books are compiled in alphabetical order by surname and available at the genealogy library at the Monroe County History Center in Bloomington, Indiana.

An index to the two volumes was recently completed and made available to the many county databases available online through the Indiana Genealogy Society website.  Although many of the Monroe County databases at the IGS website are free to anyone, the combined index to the two volumes of affidavits is restricted to members only.  The index includes:  name, address and age of recipient; war in which the veteran served; and year of volume.

affidavit

Post by Randi Richardson